Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Reprise Review: Blue Wicked by Alan Jones


Genre: Police Procedural

Description:

Eddie Henderson is investigating a series of brutal murders around Glasgow, but no-one in the authorities wants to listen to him. Eddie is a vet and the victims are all cats, killed in a fashion designed to maximize pain and suffering. When human remains start appearing, killed in exactly the same fashion as the felines, Eddie finally gets some attention. He begins to track down the killer with the help of junior detective Catherine Douglas but the bodies begin to pile up…

Author:

Alan Jones was born and brought up in Glasgow but now lives on the Ayrshire coast. Jones works in the animal health industry. He’s been writing gritty crime for a decade, and publishes his work under a pen name. In his spare time Jones makes furniture, sails boats, reads and cooks.

You can learn more about Mr. Jones’ books please check out his author page on Amazon or his website.

Appraisal:

Some months ago I reviewed Jones’ debut, The Cabinetmaker. It was an interesting novel that had much going for it and, when the author’s second work appeared, I was more than happy to take a look. And I wasn’t disappointed. In Blue Wicked Jones takes a huge step forward as a writer (and he was in a good place to start with). This is an accomplished, well-constructed crime novel that deserves a wide audience.

The opening is very intriguing – Henderson investigates a death, but it’s not conventional in approach. Henderson isn’t a copper and the body is a cat. It’s a quick reveal that cleverly shows the reader this story is a little different. In addition that the investigating protagonists are a vet and a wet behind the ears DC are also somewhat novel. The setting is suitably grim Glasgow, so the other main characters and the action are within this mould.

The story itself clips along, and does not sag at all. I read pretty much the whole of Blue Wicked on a long transatlantic flight rather than sleep. There’s a love interest for introverted Henderson and, even when you think the story is told, there’s more to be revealed. I’m reluctant to say more in case of giving away the plot.

With The Cabinetmaker the author produced a mass of supporting information on a website. For those interested in backstory, you won’t be disappointed.

Good, solid writing. I look forward to Mr. Jones’ third work with even more anticipation than previously.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Some gruesome murders. Scottish accenting to some dialogue and UK convention.

Added for Reprise Review: Blue Wicked was a nominee in the Mystery category for B&P 2015 Readers' Choice Awards. Original review ran October 25, 2014

Format/Typo Issues:

None.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: Keith Nixon

Approximate word count: 80,000-85,000 words

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Review: Who by Karen A. Wyle


Genre: Science Fiction

Description:

In the near future, 2045 according to the Global Future 2045 International Congress of 2013, humans with adequate means will be able to have their minds uploaded into computers to achieve digital immortality. One computer specialist and musician who does so finds herself in a legal battle to maintain her human identity and free will against corporate greed and an enterprise with a political agenda.

Author:

“Karen A. Wyle was born a Connecticut Yankee, but eventually settled in Bloomington, Indiana, home of Indiana University. She now considers herself a Hoosier. Wyle's childhood ambition was to be the youngest ever published novelist. While writing her first novel at age 10, she was mortified to learn that some British upstart had beaten her to the goal at age 9.

Wyle is an appellate attorney, photographer, political junkie, and mother of two daughters.”

Appraisal:

Wyle undertakes an ambitious project to give social context to the seriously considered goal of copying the consciousness of humans into computer hardware.

How will the “stored” interact with the world of the living? What are their legal rights? Do they remain citizens of their homeland? Can they vote?

Wyle answers the last question “yes.” If so, can they be manipulated to support policies they would have opposed when they were alive? Are unrequested “improvements” made by programmers to the stored’s personalities and physical characteristics an attack on free will? Or is elimination of arthritic pain and sagging skin simply a benefit freely provided? How about easing an unsociably nasty temper?

While the story is thought provoking on an intellectual level, there is little emotional or plot tension. Even though the stored heroine and her living husband maintain a loving relationship, including somewhat unfulfilling romantic encounters, it is presented largely through exposition and sterile dialog.

The husband and wife are central players in the first half of the book, but at chapter 13 of the 26 chapter story, they become passive players in their own destiny except for cooperating with their brilliant lawyer. That might mirror reality, but it doesn’t make for a gripping story. Much of the second part is a mockup of court proceedings complete with legal reasoning for assumed complaints, testimony, objections and conferences with the judge. Rulings by an appellate court and the Supreme Court follow. That is all interesting in itself, but it is a tedious advance to the story’s human drama.

If the technology is ever developed, the questions Wyle addresses will have to be considered. “Who” should be required reading for Ray Kurzweil and his fellow futurists--or better yet, a short essay by the very thoughtful Wyle.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: Sam Waite

Approximate word count: 85-90,000 words

Monday, March 20, 2017

Review: A Killing Truth by DV Berkom


Genre: Thriller

Description:

They say the truth will set you free, but what if it kills you first?
Before serial killers and drug cartels, Leine Basso faced the ultimate betrayal…
Leine eliminates terrorists for a living. After a routine assassination almost gets her killed, she chalks it up to a fluke. Her lover and fellow assassin, Carlos, has another idea altogether. He thinks their boss is setting them up for a fall.
When Carlos goes missing and a bombing thwarts another mission, Leine suspects the stakes are far higher than she could ever imagine, and wonders if the man in charge might have it in for her after all.”

Author:

“DV Berkom is the USA Today best-selling author of two action-packed thriller series featuring strong female leads: Leine Basso and Kate Jones. Her love of creating resilient, kick-ass women characters stems from a lifelong addiction to reading spy novels, mysteries, and thrillers, and longing to find the female equivalent within those pages.”

Appraisal:

If you've read the books in the Leine Basso series that have come out prior to this, you know a lot about her history. That she worked as an assassin for a quasi-official government agency was always clear. That she no longer did was also clear. And at least to me it seemed that her feelings about her history were ambiguous, with some pride and some regret.

This book is a prequel, coming before any of the main series. It takes place near the end of Leine's time as an assassin. It works as a standalone thriller, with an intense, edge-of-your-seat story. However, those who “know” Leine from the main series will come to understand her that much better after reading A Killing Truth. And while I may be reading more into it than was intended, I think the way this book ended there may be another prequel in the future. Maybe more than one.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Some adult language.

Since this is a prequel to the series there is no reason someone would have to have read the rest of the series to enjoy the story.

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 35-40,000 words

Friday, March 17, 2017

Review: The Flight of the Pickerings by John Grayson Heide


Genre: General Fiction

Description:

"Guy Pickering is a good man and good husband to his wife Dorothy who grows wackier every day with dementia. Guy sees the end coming and wants to be in control, but Life has other plans. His most private moments spiral out of control as a nosy neighbor intrudes, a rebellious teenage grandson shows up and finally a fame-hungry reporter spotlights them in front of a world-wide audience." 

Author:

"The Flight of the Pickerings is based on a dream which came at a time of extreme stress in John's life. He was living in paradise (Hawaii) and watching his life savings evaporate. Negativity abounded, but the dream/story would not let go and John felt the increasing need to write it out. In writing, his life re-focused on bigger and better aspects and helped him move on. The story had a life of its own and after 8 years of steady re-writing, he’s finally happy to share it. Some people will appreciate the book and the underlying message of life and its sacredness. Also death, and its own brand of sacredness. Some people might take the story as an endorsement for suicide. This is not the intention of the book. The highest good this book might foster would be a brave and intelligent discussion among families regarding end of life issues."

Appraisal:

This is a book about life and how we choose to live it, and with whom. It is also about death, our attitude to it, our reluctance to deal with it, our making peace with it eventually. But mostly this is a book about love, real, true love, and how far we are prepared to go for the beloved. It's an unusual book to come across these days of dark, graphic thrillers and erotic love stories. The prologue is exciting and welcomes the reader into the lives of Guy Pickering and his wife, Dorothy.

Guy is the main character, a devoted, caring husband to Dorothy who is both senile and terminally ill. Guy will do anything to make her life, and death, easier. He had been a courageous soldier in his younger days, in both Korea and Vietnam, earning himself a Purple Heart; he needs this courage now. He is a very lovable character, as is Dorothy and the reader becomes deeply involved in their problems.

The narrative is well paced and the characters are believable, including the teenage grandson who swings between being mature and thoughtful, and uncaring and hostile, in the space of a minute. The dialogue is realistic and carries the story forward.

There is a lot of humour in this story, with a fussy daughter, Darlene, and a very nosy neighbour across the street. These characters, and the sulky grandson too,  lighten the sadness of the Pickerings in a natural, unforced way.

A strange thing about this book is the way the author assigns thoughts and feelings to the family cat and also to the cars that Guy drives, as in:

"The modest Ford Fairlane sedan that had sat for years in the shadow of the big beautiful Olds, cringed once again in self-loathing beside the blustering growl of the mighty classic."

And, when the car realises what Guy is up to:

"This can’t be! No! Oh, goodbye, sir! This can't be what’s best for you."

It's a strange quirk which adds nothing to the story, only popping up now and again.

Some of the prose is overblown and a bit purple:

" . . . his voice enveloping her body with a soothing balm."

And:

"A sense of honorable dignity joined a hint of relief and breathed its wonderful scent over Guy."

Overall, this is a lovely story, well worth reading - and thinking about. It covers a difficult topic with humour and compassion. The ending is perfect - and very exciting.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

There was one common, grammatical error:

" . . . grandson—the same one that moments before had inferred that his grandparents ought to just go off and die."

This should read:  " . . . had implied that his . . . "

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues

Rating: Four Stars ****

Reviewed by: Joan Slowey

Approximate word count: 90-95,000 words

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Review: To Shoot a Musky by Bill Stokes

Genre: Short Story

Description:

“Satchel was the undisputed king of the resident muskies. He had roamed the flowage for years, periodically terrorizing innocent fisherman by surfacing like a whale so close to a boat that the occupants could look deep into the fish's black eyes and see what seemed to be undiluted piscatorial evil.”

Author:

A native of Wisconsin, Bill Stokes has had a long career as a columnist and journalist for several newspapers in Wisconsin as well as a stint at the Chicago Tribune.


Appraisal:

This is a fishing story, I suppose. But I'm not much of a fishing story kind of guy and I loved this short story because it is so much more. It's a Cheesehead Moby Dick. It's a wonderful tale about the love between a grandparent and a grandchild. It's a short glimpse into life in small-town Wisconsin. It's a darn good read.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 2-3,000 words

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Review: Enchanting Death by Laura J Adams


Genre: Urban Fantasy/Mystery

Description:

“His first holiday for two years, the only thing Agent Philippe Girard had planned was a relaxing holiday, a wedding and a full moon hunt with old friends.

Sent to oversee local rookie Max Striga as she makes an arrest, his plans soon unravel when the discovery of a body drags him head first into a high stakes murder case.

With demons, enchantments and old enemies, plus an idealistic young partner who simultaneously infuriates him and brings out his protective instincts, Philippe finds himself in a race against time to solve the case before the murderer can strike again.”

Author:

Laura J Adams: “Interested in all things fantastical since an early age (I'm sure I spent time in my wardrobe as a child trying to find Narnia) it seemed natural to create my own stories. As I grew and discovered great urban fantasy writers my stories started demanding to be put down on paper.

So armed with chocolate, hastily scribbled notes and a New Year's resolution to finally finish a book I discovered my motley crew at the Agency for Supernatural Law Enforcement and Exposure Prevention.

I now spend my days juggling work, children and writing - all while dreaming of chocolate (New Year's resolution) - and hoping one day to turn what has always been a truly enjoyable past-time into a wonderful career.”


Appraisal:

Philippe Girard is a revered agent with the Agency for Supernatural Law Enforcement and Exposure Prevention. He is a werewolf and cranky to be pulled from his first vacation in two years to accompany a rookie agent, Max Striga, on her first assignment to arrest an enchantment making witch. There wasn’t supposed to be a death involved. Things get off to a rocky start when Max, also a witch, fails to detect a hidden dark spell which causes an explosion that blows up a file cabinet, the crime scene, and Agent Philippe. Philippe wasn't injured beyond his werewolf healing abilities, but that fact did not improve his mood. Max is a competent witch but Philippe feels she may not be cut out for field work. She is also insecure and has a snarky side when she gets backed into a corner. Philippe’s boss insists Max stay on the case to assist him in unravelling the reason for the mysterious death and who the miscreant is.

The plot is enthralling and complicated with several twists. Ms. Adams does a great job keeping track of all the threads and weaving them together for a cohesive story. The characters are well developed and the dialogue is engaging.

Here is a funny excerpt where we get to see some humorous dialogue. Philippe has entered the victim’s house to make sure it is clear before Max enters. Max is standing outside on the sidewalk when an elderly neighbor, who’s out for a walk, strikes up a conversation with her. Unaware Philippe is now standing behind her. The elderly neighbor asks:

“He your boss?”

“No she’s mine – a real slave driver.”

“No offence to the lass, but how’s this tiny girl your boss? You’re late twenties, and a strapping capable looking lad. Why you settling for being an underling? Even to a pretty girl.”

“I’ve always enjoyed being under a pretty girl.”

Max gaped, her hand flying to her mouth as the flames in her cheeks soared higher…

“Officer Head got demoted – performance issues. Isn’t that right Richard.” Max smiled at her reluctant partner, the smirk falling from Phillippe’s face.

The plot moves quickly, although they seem to be spinning their wheels by just missing their quarry. While Max is trying to prove herself she takes some stupid risks without Philippe’s permission. She has a lot to learn and she deserves Philippe’s quick temper outbursts. However, he is learning to appreciate her spunk. I would love to see something romantic develop between them. The sexual tension is certainly there.

I have some real concerns with the editing or proofing of the copy I was given to read. Besides the typical missing or wrong words used there were problems with the spelling of Philippe’s name. I came across several Phillipe and even a Phillip. A good editor should have caught this problem and getting the main character’s name wrong is not something I tolerate. So, I have to deduct a star.

I would strongly recommend a whole re-editing of Enchanting Death because the story is good enough to put forth the effort. Urban Fantasy is one of my favorite genres and I did enjoy this unique book. The ending wraps up nicely, but another storyline brings into question that it may be related more directly to the main plot. Further investigation needs to be done on the case. It’s a nice hook for book two. I can’t wait to see Philippe and Max work together now that he knows exactly who Max is.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Enchanting Death is the first book in the Agency Series. Ms. Adams’ also uses British spelling and vocabulary.

Format/Typo Issues:

Too many for reading comfort described in the body of my review.

Rating: *** Three Stars

Reviewed by: ?wazithinkin

Approximate word count: 75-80,000 words

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Review: Being Travis by Melissa Bowersock


Genre: Science Fiction/Historical Fiction/Time Travel

Description:

“Two years ago, a weird trick of time sent Travis Merrill spiraling from 2016 to the year 1877. Committed now to his life in frontier Arizona, Travis is married with a child on the way and is homesteading a ranch. His knowledge of the future, however, keeps him at odds with his neighbors, his friends… and his wife. He finds it more and more difficult to protect his home without alienating his family, yet he can’t ignore what he knows is – and will be – true.”

Author:

Melissa Bowersock is an eclectic, award-winning author who writes in a variety of genres: action/adventure, paranormal, biography, fantasy, romance, spiritual and satire. She has been both traditionally and independently published, and is a regular contributor to the superblog Indies Unlimited. For more information, visit her website.

Appraisal:

In the first book of this series, Finding Travis, the main character (in case you haven't guessed, a man named Travis), is transported back in time. In the first book he was adapting to his new environment, trying not to raise too many red flags, and wondering how, when, or whether he could get back to modern times. But then he fell in love and you know how that can mess with plans.

Being Travis picks up a couple years later. Travis is married, moving a few miles away from the army camp where he landed in the first book to settle down with his pregnant wife.

I typically find books and stories with a time travel element to be interesting thought experiments. When the person has gone Back to the Future it introduces some interesting things to consider. How does the person deal with advancements in knowledge that they're privy to, but the rest of their cohorts aren't? What things can they do safely without changing the future in some way that they'll regret? This book has some of that, as well as plenty of tense moments, balanced out by some feel good moments, and even a run in with a historical figure. It was a fun and entertaining read as well as provoking a bit of thought. I'm looking forward to the next series installment.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Although the second in a series and a situation where I think this story would be more enjoyable if a person has read the series opener, those who choose to read this as a standalone should be able to follow the story reasonably well.

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 45-50,000 words

Monday, March 13, 2017

Review: The Golden Tup by Leslie W P Garland


Genre: Fantasy/Occult

Description:

The Golden Tup - a dreadful tale of paradise being cruelly taken by latent evil.
Can evil be in a place? The tale opens with Verity, a farmer's wife, recalling how a young couple were arrested a few years previously for killing their newborn baby. How could such a nice young couple have done such a dreadful thing? Through a series of flashbacks we learn how they had created their rural idyll, how an enigmatic man had come into their lives and how their idyll and relationship had gradually fallen apart - how, with references to Milton's Paradise Lost, their paradise was lost. Gradually the young wife reveals a dreadful past, but Verity realises that she is holding something back, but what? What is the terrible truth that caused her and her husband to kill their baby?

An adult fantasy story for those who like to think about what they reading.”

Author:

“Leslie Garland was born in 1949, qualified as a Chartered Civil Engineer and worked for several years on projects in the UK, the Far East and Africa. During this period he won the Institution of Civil Engineers ‘Miller Prize’ for a paper on tunnelling. Changing times resulted in a change in direction and after qualifying as an Associate Member of both the British Institute of Professional Photography and the Royal Photographic Society he started his own stock photograph library and wrote for the trade press. An unexpected break in his Internet connection fortuitously presented the time to make a start on a long cherished project of a series of short stories, and the first two of ‘The Red Grouse Tales’ were drafted. Two more tales have followed and he is now working on a second batch of tales. He lives with his wife in Northumberland, England.”

More information is available on his website.
www.lesliegarland.co.uk

Appraisal:

The premise of this tale is pretty spooky. At least to me it is because anything that reminds me of Rosemary’s Baby gives me the shivers. But the execution didn’t serve up any stomach squirming moments because the writer told the story as a narration from the perspective of a local farmer’s wife, Verity, as though it was being related aurally. That delivery kept me one person removed from the actual occurrences. This prevented me from knowing the characters (and caring about their fate). Consequently, I was never able to feel the fear from the main characters.

The spookiest parts of the novel would have been experienced when the main characters were exposed to occult happenings, but the third-party delivery prevented that point of view. The same problem dogged the denouement, where the fearful consequence was hinted at rather than being shown.

Mr. Garland is a fine writer and the finished product is of a high technical quality. I think this would be a terrific horror tale if the main characters became the focal point.

Buy now from:            Amazon US     Amazon UK

FYI:

English settings and spelling.

Format/Typo Issues:

Rating:  *** Three Stars

Reviewed by: Pete Barber

Approximate word count: 20-25,000 words

Friday, March 10, 2017

Review: Shattered Spirit (Totem Book 4) by Christine Rains


Genre: Fantasy/Romance/Mystery/Adventure

Description:

“A haunted house isn’t going to stop Ametta Dorn from doing her job.

Frustrated that her family has left her out of the search for the missing totem tokens, Ametta Dorn loses herself in her work. She’s offered a dream job of a complete interior renovation of a famous Cremaschi house. Not even discovering the house belongs to Lucky Osberg can dampen her enthusiasm.

Lucky’s plan to spend more time with her as she works goes awry when the spirit who protects his home tries to murder her. Ametta won’t be scared off, despite being tempted to run and never come back. She was going to flee Alaska and pursue her designer dreams anyway, yet that means giving up on Lucky and the totem that is just within her grasp.”

Author:

“Christine Rains is a writer, blogger, and geek mom. She has four degrees which help nothing with motherhood but make her a great Jeopardy player. When she's not reading or writing, she's going on adventures with her son or watching cheesy movies on Syfy Channel. She's a member of S.C.I.F.I. and Untethered Realms. She has one novel and several novellas and short stories published.”

Check out her Amazon author page for all of her books or stalk her on Facebook.

Appraisal:

Ametta Dorn, the youngest of the Dorn sisters, frustrates the hell out of me. Is it a common trait for the youngest sibling to be so self-absorbed and single minded? At the age of twenty-five Ametta has secured herself as an up and coming interior designer to keep an eye on. Despite being a polar bear shifter, she is intent on opening her own business in the lower 48 or perhaps even Europe. When she decides her family doesn’t need or want her help in recovering the totem tokens that will save all shifters, she moves her timeclock up for her move out of Alaska. Her attraction to Lucky is distracting her from her goal.

Lucky Osberg, a handsome Kodiak shifter who has his eye on Ametta, has the patience of a saint and a plan. He hires her to do a renovation on his house, which happens to be a famous Cremaschi house. This is a dream come true for Ametta, and here she thought Lucky was only a volunteer firefighter. She hasn’t taken the time to get to know him through his pursuit because he has no desire to leave Alaska and that doesn’t fit her dream for her future. Her short-sightedness also bites her in the butt when she discovers that she isn’t even aware of the totems that make up the totem pole, which scattered its tokens all over Alaska to protect itself. See why she frustrated me? Ametta is my least favorite sister. However, I love Lucky.

The addition of Lucky’s house being haunted was an interesting twist. Through the years the spirit has always been a protective entity and its change of character puzzles and disheartens Lucky. The spirit’s aggression is centered on Ametta, which forces her to take a hard look at herself. Lucky tries to protect her, but much of his effort is thwarted by the contentious spirit.

An additional bonus was Ametta’s two phone conversations with Saskia and then later with both Saskia and Sedge. So we gained another peek into their relationship, which I enjoyed immensely.

Shattered Spirit is Ametta’s journey to self-realization and she has redeemed herself, somewhat, in my view. This addition to the series is enthralling and I was able to read it in one evening, because I didn’t want to put it down.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Contains adult language with several F-bombs. Shattered Spirit is the fourth book in the Totem series. This series of novellas build on each other and should be read in order.

Format/Typo Issues:

I came across no proofing or editing issues.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: ?wazithinkin

Approximate word count: 20-25,000 words

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Review: Secret Workplace Romance by Roxanne Amour


Genre: Romance

Description:

“A secret office Romance leads to insomnia, lies, and layoffs!”

Author:

Roxanne Amour writes short, clean romance stories.

Appraisal:

Oh, my. I'll start by quoting the first two paragraphs of this story. Give it a read, then we'll talk.

After an impossible day at the office, the only thing on Jenifer's mind was a steaming, hot bubble bath a tall glass of Merlot and a well-earned night’s rest in her cozy, little bed.

Jennifer Grant put up with the boisterous goings-on coming from the apartment overhead as long as humanly possible finally after tossing and turning for hours she decided something must be done. Nevertheless, three o'clock in the morning was hardly the time to be pacing back and forth accompanied by loud music right over her head.

Did you notice the author doesn't know how to spell the protagonist's name? It can be Jenifer or Jennifer, not both. But both get used throughout the story. However, that's relatively minor and I'm sure will get fixed quickly. So we'll move on.

Is it just me or does the first sentence in the second paragraph run on forever? How many thoughts are there? Maybe it could be broken into a couple sentences. Maybe throw in a comma or two.

Jennifer Grant put up with the boisterous goings-on coming from the apartment overhead as long as humanly possible. Finally, after tossing and turning for hours, she decided something must be done.

Lines like these were popping up constantly in this book. It appears to me the only editing and proofreading help the author had to polish this story was her word processor's spell checker.

As for the underlying story, it's hard to tell how much I'd like it if it had been more readable. Possibly that influenced my attitude toward the characters. But by the end I found the heroine and the two men in her life, the three most important characters, all to be unlikable. On the positive side, this is a romance and it did get to the happily-ever-after ending required of the genre. So it has that going for it.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

Numerous proofreading and copyediting errors.

Rating: * One Star

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count:  7-8,000 words